Plagiarism found in the work of Upstate Cancer Institute Director Dr. Ziwei Huang

Dr. Ziwei Huang is Director of Upstate Cancer Institute and Chairman of Pharmacology Department at Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York.

An article by Dr. Ziwei Huang as senior author entitled, “Structure-based virtual screening of chemical libraries for drug discovery” published in Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2006, 10:194–202, appears to have plagiarized from at least 8 different publications and a course material. Here are examples:

Example1

Example1c

Example2

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University of Waterloo Professor and Canada Research Chair Dr. Dongqing Li’s case of Plagiarism

http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/798418–university-of-waterloo-researchers-apologize-issue-retraction-after-using-u-s-research-as-their-own

As reported in The Record.com and other media outlets, University of Waterloo Professor and Canada Research Chair Dr. Dongqing Li authored a review article that had lifted text (plagiarism) from articles authored by an MIT professor named Dr. Martin Z. Bazant. Professor Dongqing Li was editor of Microfluidics and Nanonfluidics and has since resigned. The following is an example of some textual similarities between the two articles (full report is can be found here http://bazantgroup.mit.edu/~cogswell/plagiarism/SBS.1.html):

Dongqing Li article: [A surprising aspect of these experiments was the strong interaction of the Janus particles and the glass walls of the microchannel (Kilic and Bazant 2007; Zhao and Bau 2007a, b). Although symmetric polarizable particles are expected to be repelled from insulating walls (Zhao and Bau 2007a, b; Wu and Li 2009), the Janus particles were attracted to the surface and observed moving parallel to the surface, very close to it (apparently within a particle diameter). The wall attraction has been attributed to hydrodynamic torque (Kilic and Bazant 2007) which rotates the dielectric end towards the wall, causing the Janus particle to swim towards it until a collision, and in some cases translate along the wall with a stable tilt angle around 450. This example shows the rich possibilities of ICEP in confined geometries, which we believe merit further exploration.]

Martin Bazant article: [A surprising aspect of these experiments was the strong interaction of the Janus particles and the glass walls of the microchannel. Although symmetric polarizable particles are expected to be repelled from insulating walls [45], the Janus particles were attracted to the surface and observed moving parallel to the surface, very close to it (apparently within a particle diameter). The wall attraction has been attributed to hydrodynamic torque [44],which rotates the (forward facing) dielectric end toward the wall, causing the Janus particle to swim toward it until a collision, and in some cases translate along the wall with a stable tilt angle around 45°. This example shows the rich possibilities of ICEP in confined geometries, which we believe merit further exploration.]

Update: Professor Dongqing Li suspended. Read full report here http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/866393–university-of-waterloo-to-suspend-professor-for-plagiarizing-u-s-research-in-2010

Self-Plagiarism at Harvard: Articles Retracted

 

Reported also at BioTechniques website, the following two articles published by Harvard investigators have been retracted:

 

Article 1: Shuxian Jiang et al., Cannabinoid receptor 2 and its agonists mediate hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization. Blood. 2011;117(3):827-38.

 

Article 2: Shuxian Jiang et al., Endocannabinoids are expressed in bone marrow stromal niches and play a role in interactions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with the bone marrow microenvironment. J Biol Chem J Biol Chem. 2010;285(46):35471-35478.

 

Corresponding Author on both articles: Dr. Hava Karsenty Avraham, Division of Experimental Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, 99 Brookline Ave, 3rd floor, Boston, MA 02215.

According to Blood: “The authors and the journal wish to retract the 20 January 2011 paper cited above, because it contains multiple instances of duplicate (redundant) publication of data, text, and images that are nonessential to the paper. The redundancies are between the above-cited Blood article and the following 12 November 2010 article, published in the Journal of Biologic Chemistry (JBC): Jiang S, Zagozdzon R, Jorda MA, et al. Endocannabinoids are expressed in bone marrow stromal niches and play a role in interactions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with the bone marrow microenvironment. J Biol Chem. 2010;285(46):35471-35478.”

“The authors apologize to the readers, reviewers, and editors of both journals for publishing duplicate data.”

According to Journal of Biological Chemistry indicated on PubMed Central:

 “This article has been withdrawn by the authors”

A comparison of the two papers indicates duplication of Table 1 and extensive duplication of word-for-word text as follows:

Extracted from Journal of Biologic Chemistry: [To study the role of endocannabinoids in hematopoietic stem cell niche, we examined the expression of 2-AG and AEA in bone marrow stromal cells. As shown in Table 1, both 2-AG and AEA were detected in stromal cells, with AEA at 35.2 pg/107 cells and 2-AG at 75.2 ng/107 cells.]

[Understanding the signals that regulate HSCs development and the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that are involved in maintenance of HSC in bone marrow niches are crucial for proper hematopoiesis. Hematopoiesis is a life long process in which HSPCs differentiate into mature blood cells. These HSCs are valuable in a clinical setting for patients requiring hematopoietic repair (31,–37). The current treatment involves hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with HSPCs obtained from mobilized peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood (31). Re-population of hematopoiesis is a multistep process regulated by the ability of HSPCs to migrate, home to the appropriate marrow niches, and differentiate to mature blood cells. Hence, insights into the physiological stimuli as well as external signals that induce HSPC exit from the bone marrow and traffic to peripheral blood is important for proper hematopoiesis repair. Here, we provide new evidence on the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in hematopoiesis by inducing migration and mobilization of HSPCs from the BM niches to blood circulation following exposure to stress inducers such as LPS, or to exogenous cannabinoid agonists. The migration of HSPCs to peripheral circulation may limit tissue damage and contribute to hematopoietic repair. Endocannabinoids may regulate hematopoiesis in the BM by maintaining important HSPC functions such as survival.]

Extracted from Blood: Extracted from Blood: [To study the role of the endocannabinoid system in BM-stromal cells, we examined the expression of endocannabinoids 2-AG and AEA in BM-stromal cells. As shown in Table 1, both 2-AG and AEA were detected with AEA at 35.2 pg/107 cells and 2-AG at 75.2 ng/107cells.]

[Understanding of the signals that regulate HSPC development and the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that are involved in maintenance of HSC in the BM niches are crucial for proper hematopoiesis. Hematopoiesis is a lifelong process in which HSPCs differentiate into mature blood cells. These HSPCs are valuable in a clinical setting for patients requiring hematopoietic repair.21 The current treatment involves hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with HSPCs obtained from mobilized peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood. Repopulation of hematopoiesis is a multistep process that is regulated by the ability of HSPCs to migrate, home to the appropriate marrow niches, and differentiate to mature blood cells. Hence, insights into the physiologic stimuli as well as external signals that induce HSPC exist from the BM, and traffic to peripheral blood is important for proper hematopoiesis repair. In this regard, we provide new evidence on the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in hematopoiesis by inducing migration and mobilization of HSPCs from the BM niches to the blood circulation after exposure to stress inducer, such as LPS, or to exogenous cannabinoid agonists. The migration of HSPCs to the peripheral circulation may limit tissue damage and contribute to hematopoietic repair. …]